Research Summary

The human brain is an incredibly efficient information processor, and one of its defining features is its ability to adapt its function based on experience – that is, to learn. My research focuses on regularity learning: our ability to adapt to predictable patterns in our environment. For example, we may learn that the traffic on our way to work is consistently bad at particular times of day, or that butterflies prefer a particular tree in the garden. My work uses techniques from cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience to explore which kinds of regularities we can learn, how different cognitive processes such as attention and working memory interact with learning, and the consequences of regularity learning for behaviour and neural processing. I currently work as a senior research scientist in the Queensland Attention and Control Lab at The University of Queensland. I am also a Young Science Ambassador with the Wonder of Science.

Publications

Peer-Reviewed Publications

Hall, M. G., Mattingley, J. B., & Dux, P. E., (2018). Electrophysiological correlates of incidentally learned expectations in human vision. Journal of Neurophysiology, 119, 1461-1470.
Hall, M. G., Naughtin, C. K., Mattingley, J. B., & Dux, P. E., (2018). Distributed and opposing effects of incidental learning in the human brain. NeuroImage, 173, 351-360.
fMRI dataset available at openneuro.org/datasets/ds001241.
Hall, M. G., Mattingley, J. B., & Dux, P. E., (2015). Distinct contributions of attention and working memory to visual statistical learning and ensemble processing. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 41, 1112-1123.
Laurent, P. A., Hall, M. G., Anderson, B. A., & Yantis, S., (2015). Valuable orientations capture attention. Visual Cognition, 23, 133-146.
Anderson, B. A., Leal, S. L., Hall, M. G., Yassa, M. A., & Yantis, S., (2014). The attribution of value-based attentional priority in individuals with depressive symptoms. Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Neuroscience, 14, 1221-1227.
Kamke, M. R., Hall, M. G., Lye, H. F., Sale, M. V., Fenlon, L. R., Carroll, T. J., Riek, S., & Mattingley, J. B., (2012). Visual attentional load influences plasticity in the human motor cortex. Journal of Neuroscience, 32, 7001-7008.

Conference Talks

Hall, M. G., Naughtin, C. K., Mattingley, J. B., & Dux, P. E., (Nov 2017). Distributed and opposing effects of incidental learning on visual processing in the human brain. Australasian Cognitive Neuroscience Society annual meeting, Adelaide, Australia.
Hall, M. G., Mattingley, J. B., & Dux, P. E., (Dec 2014). Decoding incidental learning of object features in the visual processing hierarchy. Centre for Perception and Cognitive Neuroscience Retreat, Stradbroke Island, Australia.
Anderson, B. A., Leal, S. L., Hall, M. G., Yassa, M. A., & Yantis, S., (Nov 2014). The attribution of value-based attentional priority in individuals with depressive symptoms. Object Perception, Attention, and Memory annual meeting, Long Beach, CA.
Hall, M. G., Mattingley, J. B., & Dux, P. E., (May 2014). Statistical processing in perception and cognition. QBI-MCN Autumn School and Workshop, Heron Island, Australia.

Conference Posters

Hall, M. G., Naughtin, C. K., Mattingley, J. B., & Dux, P. E., (Jun 2016). The influence of expectation on visual processing in the human brain. Organization for Human Brain Mapping annual meeting, Geneva, Switzerland.
Hall, M. G., Mattingley, J. B., & Dux, P. E., (Nov 2014). Attention modulates the relationship between summary statistics and incidental learning of regularities. Society for Neuroscience annual meeting, Washington, DC, USA.
Hall, M. G., Mattingley, J. B., & Dux, P. E., (Aug 2014). Estimating ensemble statistics impairs statistical learning. Science of Learning Research Centre Big Day Out, Adelaide, Australia.
Hall, M. G., Mattingley, J. B., & Dux, P. E., (Apr 2014). Estimating ensemble statistics impairs statistical learning. Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference (EPC), Brisbane, Australia.
Laurent, P. A., Anderson, B. A., Hall, M. G., & Yantis, S., (May 2012). Value-driven attentional capture by rewarded orientations. Vision Sciences Society annual meeting, Naples, FL, USA.

Contact

School of Psychology
McElwain Building
The University of Queensland
St Lucia, QLD 4072 Australia

michelle.hall@uqconnect.edu.au

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